Connect with us

Accountability

Two teens ages 14 and 15 charged with fatal shooting of Seattle high school student

Published

on

Two teenagers are facing charges in relation to the fatal shooting of a student inside Ingraham High School in north Seattle Tuesday morning.

Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell mentioned the shooting in a Tuesday press conference, saying: “I needed you to know we are dealing with a death.”

Harrell was accompanied by Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz, Seattle Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Brent Jones and Rep. Pramila Jayapal.

Details of the incident are still being released and the identities of the two suspects are unlikely to be released due to their age, however KOMO News reported that one of the suspects is 14 years old, and the other is 15.

The two suspects have been denied bail and are currently being held in a juvenile detention center.

The judge in the case said he had probable cause to charge the 14-year-old with first-degree murder, second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and possession of a dangerous weapon on a school campus.

The King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office argued in court Wednesday there was probable cause to charge the 15-year-old with second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and first-degree rendering criminal assistance.

Both suspects were seen on a metro bus not long after the shooting.  Prosecutors alleged that a semi-automatic handgun which could have been the murder weapon was found in the 15-year-old’s backpack when they were arrested.

The mom and dad of the 15-year-old teen suspect appeared in court and begged the judge to allow them to take their son home.

“We just moved up here and he got in with the wrong people,” the boy’s father said. “He’s never been trouble before.”

Prosecutors disagreed, with Brent Kling, the Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, pointing out that “the magazine was empty.”

“Law enforcement personnel who are trained and knowledgeable in firearms indicated that the condition of the firearm when it was located that that condition generally exists when the firearm has been fired until it is empty,” Kling said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
CATEGORY:Accountability
Click to comment
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Trending

0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x