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Prosecutors say Alex Jones’ lawyer accidentally sent them his entire phone record

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According to Wednesday’s court records, Alex Jones’ legal team have inadvertently sent over his phone records to the prosecutors. Jones is in the middle of his defamation trial for stating that the Sandy Hook shootings were a hoax.

The Parents of Sandy Hook victims are suing Jones for $150 million in damages after Jones dubbed the shootings as “synthetic,” a “false flag,” and went onto say that the grieving families were “crisis actors.”

Attorney Mark Bankston, who is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs, showed the court a text message regarding Sandy Hook that Bankston alleged was sent from Jones’s cell phone.

Bankston addressed Jones and said “Do you know where I got this?” Jones replied, “No.” Bankston went onto say: “Twelve days ago, your attorneys messed up and sent me an entire digital copy of your entire cellphone with every text message that you’ve sent for the past two years — and when informed, did not take any steps to identify it as privileged or protected.”

Jones stated during pre-trial proceedings under oath that he had conducted a thorough search for any text messages relating to Sandy Hook, but came up empty handed. Bankston went onto confront Jones by saying these texts confirm what he already knew, that Jones was lying.

“That is how I know you lied to me when you said you didn’t have any text messages about Sandy Hook. Did you know this?”

Jones denied handing over his phone to any of his legal team. “I guess this is your ‘Perry Mason’ moment,” he added. “You know what perjury is, right?” Bankston queried. “Yes, I do,” Jones hit back. “I mean, I’m not a tech guy.”

A Perry Mason moment is defined as: “A moment during legal or judicial proceedings when evidence or other information, usually unknown to most present, is introduced into the record in a manner seen as determinative of the outcome of the proceedings regardless of whatever else occurs.”

Jones’ companies Infowars and Free Speech Systems both filed for bankruptcy at the beginning of the trial. Jones arrived at the courthouse last week with “Save the 1st” written on duct tape, which he used to cover his mouth.

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